Jesmond Surgery Phone: 0191 2814444

Gosforth Surgery Phone: 0191 2132001

Invisalign Braces Cosmetic Dentistry Anxious Patients Facial Cosmetics Smile Gallery Implants



Emergency Tips

These are guidelines for common problems, aimed at helping you decide arranging an emergency appointment with the surgery of if outside surgery hours, to ring the emergency dentist. This will help reduce unnecessary visits to the dentist. Above all, remember that if you are experiencing dental pain, arrange to see the dentist if the problem persists. This will also aid us in reducing unnecessary out of hours emegencies. Where we indicate the use of painkillers, do not exceed the recommended dose.

What to do if you are in pain!

The type of pain is placed in the following categories:

  1. Sensitivity, especially cold

    If the pain only lasts a short time it may indicate that you have sensitive teeth or that you have decay in your tooth. Only your dentist can decide which is causing your pain and you should make an appointment with them. Although this is not an emergency you should see your dentist as soon as is convenient to prevent the pain getting worse. You could try to apply toothpaste for sensitive teeth on the area (this will not help if the cause is decay), painkillers may also help. You should also avoid excessive temperature changes.

  2. Continuous throbbing pain

    This type of pain may indicate you have an abscess on the tooth, you should try to get to your dentist as soon as possible or ring the emergency dentist. Painkillers may offer a little relief. This type of pain may also be associated with a swelling. If the swelling increases in size rapidly or you find it becomes difficult to breathe you should seek advice immediately from your dentist or ring the emergency dentist.

  3. From recently filled tooth

    Teeth that have recently been filled may cause a slight discomfort especially if the restoration was deep. Try painkillers, if this is not controlling the pain then make an appointment to see your dentist. If the tooth feels a little bit high then the filling may need adjusting. Your dentist should carry out this procedure.

    If you have undergone root canal treatment, then it is normal to get some discomfort for a few days. Painkillers usually control the discomfort. However, if the problem persists, ring your dentist for advice.

  4. From broken tooth or filling

    It may be an idea to try painkillers if the tooth or filling has recently broken. If this controls the pain then arrange to see your own dentist as soon as possible. In some cases where the pain is not controlled by painkillers then arrange an emergency appointment with your dentist or if outside surgery hours ring the emergency dentist.

  5. Swelling and/or temperature

    If the pain is from a tooth with a swollen gum around it and/or you have a temperature, then an emergency appointment with your dentist or if outside surgery hours ring the emergency dentist.

What should I do if I've injured my mouth/face in an accident?

If the trauma is a result of an accident it may be wise to go to the nearest casualty clinic. Common sense should prevail. If in doubt ring up 'NHS direct' who will advise you further.

What do I do if I keep bleeding after a tooth has been removed?

Using a clean wet tissue, place in the area where the tooth was removed. Bite or press tissue hard for 10 minutes, repeat if necessary. If this fails to work then arrange an emergency appointment with your dentist or if outside surgery hours ring the emergency dentist.

What do I do if my gums bleed?

If the gums bleed now and then or when you brush them, then make an appointment to see your dentist. If the gums suddenly bleed then arrange an emergency appointment with your dentist or if outside surgery hours ring the emergency dentist.

I'm bleeding after injuring my mouth, what do I do?

If the bleeding is due to trauma, ie. you have bitten your tongue or lips then apply a clean wet tissue, place in the area where your bleeding. Bite or press tissue hard for 10 minutes, repeat if necessary. If this fails to work then arrange an emergency appointment with your dentist or if outside surgery hours ring the emergency dentist.

I have broken a tooth, what do I do?

If you chipped yout teeth, then try to to collect any piece(s) that you can find, store them in milk. If you are in some pain take some painkillers and arrange an emergency appointment with your dentist or if outside surgery hours ring the emergency dentist.

I have knocked out a tooth, can it be put back?

Yes, with a good chance of success. So if a tooth is knocked out, don’t panic but act quickly:

  • Make sure its a second tooth: the front teeth come through between the ages of six and nine. Don't try to replace baby teeth.
  • Find the tooth: Hold the tooth by the crown (the part usually visible in the mouth) not by the root (the part of the tooth inside the gum). Don’t scrub the tooth or place it in disinfectant.
  • If the tooth is clean: Hold it by the crown and gently push it back into its socket making sure that it is the right way round. This is usually painless if done immediately after the accident.
  • If the tooth is dirty: Rinse it in milk or cold water before gently pushing it back into place.
  • Hold the tooth in place: Bite on a handkerchief and go to the dentist immediately for advice.

We recommend that you contact your dentist as soon as is possible, or follow the instructions here.

If you can’t put the tooth back in: